A cup of coffee and two Little Debbie snack cakes, I guess
Nick Saban on why he wakes up in the morning  (via cvilletochucktown)

(via birminghambelle)



georgianadesign:

Houston home builder Allan Edwards.

georgianadesign:

Houston home builder Allan Edwards.

(via birminghambelle)


WHOAH reblogging for future reference I have never seen an explanation for this that made sense.

(via calllmeclassy)


benandjerrys:

What the what?!? We’re very excited to announce our newest flavor in honor of NBC’s 30 Rock: Liz Lemon Greek Frozen Yogurt! A Lemon Greek Frozen Yogurt with a Blueberry Lavender Swirl, coming this spring!

uh YEAH I’ll be eating this.

benandjerrys:

What the what?!? We’re very excited to announce our newest flavor in honor of NBC’s 30 Rock: Liz Lemon Greek Frozen Yogurt! A Lemon Greek Frozen Yogurt with a Blueberry Lavender Swirl, coming this spring!

uh YEAH I’ll be eating this.

(via popculturebrain)


During the act of reading engaging fiction, we can lose all sense of time. By the final chapter of the right book, we feel changed in our own lives, even if what we’ve read is entirely made up.

Research says that’s because while you’re engaged in fiction—unlike nonfiction—you’re given a safe arena to experience emotions without the need for self-protection. Since the events you’re reading about do not follow you into your own life, you can feel strong emotions freely.

[…]

The key metric the researchers used is “emotionally transported,” or how deeply connected we are to the story. Previous research has shown that when we read stories about people experiencing specific emotions or events it triggers activity in our brains as if we were right there in the thick of the action.

New study by Dutch researchers confirms previous theories that reading fiction makes you a better person by expanding your capacity for empathy.

Also see how storytelling makes us human.

(via explore-blog)

(via explore-blog)


nprfreshair:

The Guardian:

The unstoppable Hilary Mantel has added another award to her astonishing haul of major literary prizes when judges at a ceremony in London unanimously named Bring up the Bodies the 2012 Costa book of the year. Mantel became the first novelist to win both the Man Booker and the Costa prize…

Our November interview with Mantel, author of Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies,  here.

yeah these books are the best. stop whatever you’re doing and read them now.

nprfreshair:

The Guardian:

The unstoppable Hilary Mantel has added another award to her astonishing haul of major literary prizes when judges at a ceremony in London unanimously named Bring up the Bodies the 2012 Costa book of the year. Mantel became the first novelist to win both the Man Booker and the Costa prize…

Our November interview with Mantel, author of Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodieshere.

yeah these books are the best. stop whatever you’re doing and read them now.


nprfreshair:

I’ve seen this many times and with each viewing, it’s more touching. This is a collection of outtakes from Inglourious Basterds (2009) that features actors and others on set looking to the camera and saying “Hi Sally” to Sally Menke, Quentin Tarantino’s longtime editor. 

Knowing that Menke would be sitting in a dark editing suite shaping endless amounts of footage, Tarantino thought this would be a nice way to make her smile and keep her motivated through what can be a solitary process. 

Sadly, in 2010 Sally Menke died, so Inglourious Basterds was their last collaboration.  And beyond the sweet sentiment, this set of outtakes gives us a little window into the intimate working relationship between Menke and Tarantino.

Tarantino has briefly talked about the emotional experience of working on Django Unchained (2012) without her, and said that during the entire editing process, there was a sign put up that read “WWSD” – What Would Sally Do?

A cautionary warning: This video contains some cursing…just a little…and it’s very funny.

- Heidi

this is the greatest.


betweenthewoodsandthewater:

A bird ballet | Short Film

(via giveitawhirl)